Monthly Archives: March 2015

White Whole Wheat

                                                   White Whole Wheat

Now that we have the mill we have access to things we never had before. There are hundreds (thousands?) of varieties of wheat out there. Most of what we get is a type of red wheat. By contrast, white wheat is much milder and sweeter in flavor, thanks to the light color of the bran. Occasionally, a supplier will have a few random bags of white wheat flour, but like anything a little different, it tends to be very old. Since we’re able to buy whole berries now, we can mill fresh and use the flour at its prime! This particular white wheat is sourced from one of our favorite mills in the country, Heartland Mills. It’s sourced from one farm in Kansas.

 

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White whole wheat should not be confused with white, unbleached wheat flour, where the bran and germ are separated at milling. This is 100% whole wheat and shares all the nutritional value of traditional whole wheat. The variety is considered an albino, having very little color in the bran. This lack of color contributes to its lighter color and milder flavor. There is a minute amount of red wheat in this bread from the natural leavening.

 

We will slowly start incorporating more and more white wheat into our breads, in an effort to get more people eating whole grains!

 

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Ingredients:

 

Fresh Milled White Whole Wheat (99.6%)

Fresh Milled Red Whole Wheat (.04%)

Water

Salt

 

Milling and the first bread! Emmer/Red Wheat

 

                                     WHOLE GRAIN THURSDAY IS HERE! 

 

Our mill has arrived and we’re so excited. This marks a new chapter in Seven Stars Bakery and how we treat our products. Starting this week, we have begun incorporating some of the fresh milled flour into our breads. Soon, all of the whole grain that goes into any Seven Stars Bakery bread or pastry will pass through our stone mill imported from Austria, the majority of which is sourced in the Northeast, something that was unthinkable only 5 years ago! This gives us the opportunity to source different types of grain, and mill them fresh daily, much like you would grind coffee fresh just before brewing.

 

Going forward,  I will not be using white flour in any of the breads available on Thursday afternoons. This will be a great opportunity to experiment with different types of grain, sourced locally or from around the country. There will be some unique sounding grains used. Many of which people with gluten sensitivities are able to eat. One of the biggest problems we have with sourcing interesting flour is that it is often very old by the time it gets to us. By milling the grain ourselves, we’ll be able to use the freshest flour, and never have to compromise.

Bread for February will be a 50/50 mix of Emmer and Red Wheat. Most wheat bread, whether whole grain or processed into white flour, is made with red wheat, of which there are 100’s of varieties. Compared to, less common, white wheat, it’s richer in color and flavor. Emmer is considered one of the “Ancient Grains”, said to originate in Syria around 8000 BC! Emmer is a type of wheat that is very high in protein, but low in gluten. That means, many people with gluten sensitivities can eat it, but it doesn’t make the best performing loaf of bread so the red wheat is there to give it the needed support. I would be interested in hearing if someone on the edge of gluten sensitivity can eat this bread since it has 50% Emmer. The fresh milled flour, and the flavor of Emmer is a unique combination, making for a very full flavored, rich loaf.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ingredients:

 

Fresh milled Red Wheat

Fresh milled Emmer Wheat

Water

Salt